Chris Ferguson Settles With DOJ for $2.35 Million

by TJ Gill on February 20, 2013

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    Chris “Jesus” Ferguson, the brainchild of Full Tilt Poker and one of the most notable faces of its team of “red pros,” had previously been ordered by the United States Department of Justice last September to forfeit $42 million in fines for his role in defrauding thousands of players who played on Full Tilt’s software.

    According to legal documents posted online on February 19th, 2013, the “Ferguson Account,” which contained dividends from his ownership shares in Full Tilt Poker, most likely has unknown millions of dollars (most of which was stolen from USA players’ accounts) in it.  This assets in this account, along with a fine of $2.35 million to Ferguson himself, were ordered to be handed over in the settlement.

    Excerpt from paragraph 3 of court documents regarding the initial settlement request:

    WHEREAS, on or about September 10, 2012, a verified second amended complaint (the ^Complaint”) was filed seeking the forfeiture of funds held in the Ferguson Account, and all funds traceable thereto, and also sought a civil money laundering penalty judgment of $42 million against Christopher Ferguson (“Ferguson”), with that amount representing the sum of alleged criminal proceeds transferred to Ferguson from defendant entity Full Tilt Poker;

    Fortunately for “Jesus” he barely got a slap on the wrist with that $2.35 million dollar fine, especially for a man who was supposedly clearing $10 million+ a month in company dividends from Full Tilt leading up to Black Friday.  This is another excerpt detailing his personal settlement with the DOJ:

    Ferguson further agrees to forfeit the additional amount of $2,350,000 (“the Additional Funds”) for disposition according to law, pursuant to Title 18, United States Code, Section 981, without admitting any liability thereunder. Ferguson shall make payment of the Additional Funds within 30 days of the entry of this Stipulated Order of Settlement. 

    The documents go on to say that Ferguson admitted no wrongdoing in the case against Full Tilt Poker, with the DOJ asserting that he would no longer be allowed “to work for, or derive money from, either directly or indirectly, any business offering unlawful internet gambling in the United States.”

    Before the docs had gone live on Tuesday it hadn’t been clear what penalties Ferguson had faced in the case against him following his involvement in Black Friday. The 2 million dollar fine is a hefty reminder that the price of being one of poker’s most hated men comes with consequences that go just beyond reputation.

     

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